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Human Geometry - 2007 - acrylic on linen by Alex Grey

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"TERRA" 2014, 36"x48" acrylic on canvas by Jonathan Solter

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psycho-hierophants:

la cura astral .. BY LUIS TAMANI AMASIFUEN

Source: psycho-hierophants
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psycho-hierophants:

revelaciones de la planta sagrada series … BY DAVID ESQUIBEL

Source: psycho-hierophants
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"If we still don’t understand the science and higher understanding of the ancients, then it is still magic to our minds. Magic has always been a higher understanding of nature and the cosmos. People fail to realize that this fact indicates that magic is as real as it gets and probably realer than their everyday lives, not the contrary like what the secret keepers has had everybody believing for so long now."

- Danny Voight (swimminginfrequenciez) 
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ancientart:

So who was the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar? And What do her representations in ancient art tell us about her?

Ishtar was the Babylonian and Assyrian goddess of war and love, and had close affiliation with the Sumerian goddess Inanna. Most often she was viewed as the daughter of Antum (an earth goddess) and Anu (the sky god), with a shepherd called Tammuz her primary consort (who, according to some accounts, also happened to be her son). 

The Babylonians, Sumerians and Assyrians arose in the fourth millennium BCE onwards in the area between the Euphrates and the Tigris rivers. As these civilizations began to form, Inanna became the primary goddess of Sumer (mainly in the south), with the Babylonian Ishtar later becoming dominant in the north.

Ishtar and Inanna draw many similarities to other ancient goddesses father afield, such as Aphrodite in Greece, Isis in Egypt, and Venus in Rome. What these goddesses share is an association to love, more specifically, sex; some also shared an association to war. This dual role could possibly represent the governing of both birth and death.

In ancient art, our earliest known symbol related to Ishtar is the reed bundle. The Uruk Trough, found in southern Iraq, and dates to the Late Prehistoric period (about 3300-3000 BC) shows an example of this -note the bundle of reeds projecting from the hut. This symbol likely reflects her association with fertility. Another symbol of Ishtar is the lion, as shown on the Ishtar Gate, constructed about 575 BC under King Nebuchadnezzar II.

The image used of Ishtar at the top of the post is a detail from the Burney Relief, also referred to as the Queen of the Night Relief (you can check out the full artwork here). Likely a shrine, this Old Babylonian relief was found in southern Iraq, and dates to 1800-1750 BC. As a symbol of her divinity, Ishtar holds a ring and rod of justice. The background of this relief was originally painted black, suggesting her association with the night. Her large wings hang downwards, indicating to us that she is a goddess of the Underworld.

The shown relief is currently located & courtesy of the British Museum, London, photo via the Wiki Commons, taken by .

When writing up this post Marshall Cavendish’s Gods, Goddesses, and Mythology, Volume 6 (2005) was of great use, as was the British Museum’s website when talking about the Queen of the Night Relief.

Source: ancientart
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"There’s a lot of talk these days about virtual reality— an immersive state-of-the-art technology in which you put on goggles and special clothing and enter special environments and then you are in artificial worlds created by computers. And this is thought to be very “woo woo” and far out, but in fact, if you’re paying attention, we’ve been living inside virtual realities for about ten thousand years. I mean: what is a city but a complete denial of nature? We say no, no, not trees, mudholes, waterfalls, and all that. Straight lines, laid out roads, class hierarchies reflected in local geography meaning the rich people live here surrounded by the not-so-rich people, all served by the poor people who are so glad they’re not the outcast people. So you know urbanization is essentially the first of these impulses where society leaves nature and enters into its own private Idaho."

- Terence Mckenna